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Native American Law Guide: Federal Indian, Tribal & Indigenous Peoples Law Related Resources  

Last Updated: Nov 14, 2016 URL: http://libguides.law.usd.edu/content.php?pid=409093 Print Guide RSS Updates

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Focus of this Guide

The focus of this guide is to provide a broad overview of resources available to researchers of Federal Indian, tribal, and indigenous peoples law issues.  Because many of the resources available to research Federal Indian law are similar to the resources used to research other areas of the law, less emphasis is placed on Federal Indian Law research.

While some detail is provided, users of the guide should remember that this guide is introductory in nature and focuses primarily on more widely available electronic resources and resources available at the University of South Dakota McKusick Law Library.

 

Research Guides

1. University of Washington, Gallagher Law Library, Indian and Tribal Law Research (July 22, 2015)

2.  UCLA School of Law, Hugh and Hazel Darling Law Library, Native American Law Guide: Federal Indian Law & Tribal Law Materials, (Sep 3, 2015)

3. Oklahoma City University School of Law, Native American Law, (Sep 14, 2015)

4.  The guides available from the National Indian Law Library, of the Native American Rights Fund are perhaps the most useful.  Further, the National Indian Law Library (NILL) provides Indian law-related research assistance and documents to the public via the askNILL service.

 

"Whatever Tribal Precedent There May Be": The (Un)availability of Tribal Law

While not intended as a research guide on tribal law, Bonnie Shucha's "Whatever Tribal Precedent There May Be": The (Un)availability of Tribal Law, contains an appendix listing currently available tribal law collections.  In addition to the useful appendix, the article is helpful in explaining the limited available of tribal law resources.  The article also discusses the benefits of making tribal law more accessible.

The article is accessible at no cost via the Social Science Research Network.

 

Introductory Resources

Cover Art
American Indian Law in a Nutshell, 6th Edition - William Canby
Call Number: STUDY AIDS AND ACADEMIC SUCCESS - MAIN FLOOR KF8205 .C36 2015
ISBN: 9781628100082
Publication Date: 2014-12-05

Cover Art
Mastering American Indian Law - Angelique Townsend EagleWoman; Stacy L. Leeds
Call Number: NAT. AM. & INDIG. PEOPLES - MAIN FLOOR KF8205 .E238 2013
ISBN: 9781594603297
Publication Date: 2013-08-27

 

Cohen's Handbook of Federal Indian Law

Cover Art
Cohen's Handbook of Federal Indian Law - Felix S. Cohen
Call Number: NAT. AM. & INDIG. PEOPLES - MAIN FLOOR KF8205 .C6 2012
ISBN: 9780769855165
Publication Date: 2012-06-01
Cohen's is also available electronically on LexisAdvance.

 

American Law Institute - Restatement of the Law Third, the Law of American Indians

 

Association and Conference Published Titles

Cover Art
American Indian Law Deskbook - Conference of Western Attorneys General
Call Number: NAT. AM. & INDIG. PEOPLES - MAIN FLOOR KF8205 .A76 2015
ISBN: 0314633707
Published by the Conference of Western Attorneys General. Also available via WestlawNext.

 

Indian Law Stories

Cover Art
Indian Law Stories - Carole E. Goldberg; Kevin K. Washburn
Call Number: NAT. AM. & INDIG. PEOPLES - MAIN FLOOR KF8205.A2 I527 2011
ISBN: 1599417294
Publication Date: 2010-12-28

Current LibGuide Contact

This LibGuide was originally authored by former McKusick Law Library Director, Darla Jackson.  It has been updated for 2015-2016 by Sarah Kammer, Head of Public, Faculty & Student Services at the McKusick Law Library, and Dylan Wheeler, USD Law Class of 2016, Graduate Assistant for the McKusick Law Library in 2015-2016.  Please contact Sarah Kammer below with any questions.

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Sarah Kammer
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(605)677-3930
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Tribal Nations: The Story of Federal Indian Law

 

Native American Bar Associations

1.  National Native American Bar Association

2.  South Dakota Indian Country Bar Association - "The South Dakota Indian Country Bar Association is comprised of Native and Non-Native lawyers and legal lay professionals who work in or with Indian Country. (“Indian Country” is a legal term which more or less refers to Native American Tribal governmental reservations or Native nations.) Our professionals are interested in fields such as Federal Indian law, Native American Tribal law, and State-Tribal relations."

3.  ABA Committee on Native American Concerns - "works with the Section of Individual Rights and Responsibilities to harness the vast resources of the ABA to enhance the development of federal Indian law in a manner that supports tribal sovereignty and self-governance and furthers the federal trust responsibility and government-to-government relationship between Indian tribes and the United States."

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